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Health care for rural communities

Operation Blessing trains and equips volunteers to serve areas without access to hospitals or clinics, providing much-needed health care to rural communities.

We have all made legitimate complaints about the high cost of health care and medicine, but can you image living in a place where there is no health care or medicine?

Living in America, with hospitals open 24/7 and 911 emergency service available to anyone with a phone, it’s hard to imagine what it might be like for a mother giving birth or a child suffering with a broken bone miles from nowhere, with no hospital, doctors, phone… or hope.

Operation Blessing cannot staff clinics the world over, but we are doing the next best thing: training and equipping resident community health workers. We recruit individuals already living in unserved areas. We choose people who have a willingness and aptitude to help others. We teach candidates the fundamentals of health care and provide a tool kit, a supply of basic medicines and a cell phone. In serious cases our health workers know how to get professional advice and assistance and function as a bridge between villagers and professional medical care.

Operation Blessing trains and equips volunteers to serve areas without access to hospitals or clinics, providing much-needed health care to rural communities.

In the August issue of Blessings, there is an example of why village-based health care works so well. In Kenya’s Maasai tribal villages, by tradition, mothers do not practice breast feeding. Instead, they concoct a formula of goat’s milk and butter. Many infants have difficulty digesting the formula and die or suffer malnutrition while the mother’s nutrient-rich milk goes to waste. Efforts to convince mothers that breast feeding is beneficial did not work until our resident Maasai health worker gave birth herself and carried her baby throughout the village, demonstrating proper breast feeding technique. The baby thrived, village women were amazed and started breast feeding their own children! The practice is now spreading to other Maasai villages and the regional Ministry of Health has adopted OBI’s model for community health workers.

Training and empowering locals to look after themselves is an example of how Operation Blessing’s innovative strategies enable your gifts to keep on giving.

Read full issue of August Blessings

Operation Blessing trains and equips volunteers to serve areas without access to hospitals or clinics, providing much-needed health care to rural communities.

1 Response

  1. What an incredible pleasure it is erading about al the GOOD that your organization performs all around the world!! Now, when I read the daily newspaper, I picture Bill Horan as being the president and think of all the people the few dollars that I have to live on, and praise God that I am still able to give a little bit to feed and help all those precious children!! (I also feel that America will be blessed because of the blessings you perform for the people he loves and created.)

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